Saturday, January 14, 2012

Waiting for the old people to die!

I have decided to return and edit these. In the interest of honesty, and in the hope that my writing has improved over time, I am disclaiming that in my attempt to clean up my grammar, sentence structure and punctuation, I am not intending to change the concept or message (however ill formed it might be) of any post. If I do decide to add content (as I am now,) I will try to make it obvious by using foot notes or colored text. Besides, no one is reading this anyway. 
--mq

Let me introduce the concept of "entrenched complacency".

There is a growing sense of disfranchisement mixed with apathy in younger generations. This is in part the result of the centralization of power to people who no longer have the best interests of the majority of Americans at heart. For lack of a better, non-nut jobby sounding term, I will hence forth refer to these empowered decision makers as The Establishment. Now it is not hard to see the thinly veiled motives of these elite controllers. Often it is profit and the engines of such that are granted the loudest voice in Washington DC.

This is not to paint the Establishment as a monolithic entity; as much as they would like us to view it as such, or even as a two party state. In truth neither party really has the interests of most of us in mind, and the seeming dialectic that masquerades is mostly lip service. Instead, I see it as out of touch. We have allowed them to create a platform where; science is debated by people who do not have the time necessary  to understand or more often are not qualified to fairly assess the issues, civil liberties are hard won and tenuously held, profit motivation is held on equal ground with common good, and even truth can be subject to debate.

Not that everyone apart of the system is in the wrong, just mired in entrenched complacency. Simply; this is the system as it is and enough of those in power benefit from it as it is, so they fight against those that want to see positive change. We live in a world where you can post a picture or a essay on a public forum (internet) and find out within 24 hours what ten thousand people really think of it. Who among us feels that they have that kind of access to the leadership that makes deeply life effecting choices for us everyday?

Just hypothetically, what if when you paid your taxes at the end of the fiscal cycle, you could vote with your dollar? Say you are against social security, then when you submit your taxes you can adjust a pie chart saying where you want your money to go in government. Or exclusively publicly funded elections, this would not infringe on the rights of corporations to influence elections as they are made up of people and if they treat their employees right, they most likely would vote with the interests of their employer.

I think the concept of the public servant should also be rethought. Once you reach a specific level of power, your assets should be frozen permanently. This is not to suggest that our state governors should be kept in the poor house after they retire, but have their salary and pension be based on the average median income of the area they control. Now that would be motivation for building a better future! Flat out we need to take the money out of politics so our leaders can make decisions not out of self interest, but out of what truly constitutes healthy change for our country.

So I guess we just have to wait for all the old people to die so we can fix the system.

1 comment:

  1. be.catalin@gmail.comNovember 1, 2012 at 11:44 AM

    what if in order to fix the sistem all it needs is a new approach? afresh prespective? as you may know most fields in science went onward because someone sometime went where nobody else went. then others added to it untill it became better and better.

    I think what is needed is a system wich can be easily molded into perfection by the wise men and deny the rigid structure of nowadays, that only incentives and rules govern the men.

    theres this "story of terpischore" wich paints the modern life quite well.

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